The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act is a federal law that was enacted in 1996. HIPAA protects the privacy of an individual’s health information and establishes national standards for electronic health care transactions.

There are two prevalent rules that are included in HIPAA: The Privacy Rule, The Security Rule. The Privacy Rule is the first rule established under HIPPA. This rule requires covered entities to take measures to protect the confidentiality of Protected Health Information (PHI). PHI is defined as any information related to an individual’s past, present, or future physical or mental health condition that can be used to identify them.

Covered entities must also provide individuals with a notice of their privacy practices. This notice must explain how the covered entity uses and discloses PHI. Individuals have the right to access their own PHI and request that it be amended if they believe it is incorrect.

The Security Rule is the second rule established under HIPPA. This rule requires covered entities to take measures to protect electronic PHI from unauthorized access, use, disclosure, or destruction.

To do this, covered entities must implement physical, technical, and administrative safeguards. Physical safeguards are measures taken to protect electronic information systems from natural disasters or unauthorized access. Technical safeguards are measures taken to control access to electronic PHI and ensure its confidentiality and integrity. Administrative safeguards are policies and procedures put the

What Should I Know About HIPPA? 

You should know that HIPPA is a federal law that was enacted in 1996 in order to protect the privacy of an individual’s health information. This information can be used to identify them and can include things like their past, present, or future physical or mental health condition.

If you work in the healthcare industry, it is important that you are familiar with HIPPA and how to comply with it. If you are a patient, you should know that your health information is protected by this law. You have the right to access your own health information and can request that it be corrected if necessary. You also have the right to file a complaint if you believe your privacy rights have been violated.

Does a Healthcare Proxy Override HIPPA?

No, a healthcare proxy does not override HIPPA. A healthcare proxy is a legal document that appoints someone to make decisions on your behalf if you are unable to do so yourself. This person is typically someone you trust, such as a family member or close friend.

While a healthcare proxy can make decisions about your medical care, they are not allowed to access your health information unless you have given them explicit permission to do so. If you want someone to be able to access your health information, you will need to sign a release form that specifically allows them to do so.

Should I Hire a Lawyer? 

If you have questions about HIPPA or believe your privacy rights have been violated, you should contact a lawyer. A lawyer can help you understand your rights and options under the law. They can also represent you if you decide to file a complaint or take legal action.

Don’t hesitate to reach out to our office today at (508) 571-5452 to schedule a consultation with our experienced attorney. We would be happy to answer your questions and provide the guidance you need.