How To Make Visitation After Divorce Pleasant

How To Make Visitation After Divorce Pleasant
BETH RANKIN | DAILY KENT STATER Marisa Beagle, a history major, and her daughter, Noelle, sit in the parking lot of the Salem Campus, where she attends school 45 minutes away from her home in East Palestine, near the Pennsylvania border. Marisa and Noelle, 18 months, live with Marisa's parents. A single parent, Beagle says it's tough to attend school and raise a daughter simultaneously, but with the support of her family, she's able to make it work.

BETH RANKIN | DAILY KENT STATER
Marisa Beagle, a history major, and her daughter, Noelle, sit in the parking lot of the Salem Campus, where she attends school 45 minutes away from her home in East Palestine, near the Pennsylvania border. Marisa and Noelle, 18 months, live with Marisa’s parents. A single parent, Beagle says it’s tough to attend school and raise a daughter simultaneously, but with the support of her family, she’s able to make it work.

Co-parenting is all about mutual respect and conflict resolution. After a divorce, that can sometimes be close to impossible. With the use of these tips, it can make your child’s visitation time a better experience. First thing to remember is that staying positive is the key to not only you and your former spouse getting along but that your child is comfortable with this stressful time. Also, remember that keeping the conversation focused (in a postive and non-confrontational manner) on the child’s needs is one of the best ways to stay positive.

This includes removing all squabbles and arguments from your child’s view. Visitation is a time that is all about the child and any arguments can be saved for another time.

Making sure that you are on time is one small way that a relationship with your ex is based on a mutual respect for each other and love for your child. It also gives the child less surprises by having a set schedule and less stress surrounding the situation.
Remember, that even though it is easy to get wrapped up in technology, that visitation time means that you are present literally and figuratively.
Giving children a little bit of leeway in this time is also crucial. Allow them to express themselves creatively through their choice in outfits or movies or actives. This is most likely one of the main ways your child is learning to cope with the situation at hand.
For more helpful tips, check out our newsletters and call Polly Tatum for additional mediation advice.

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